FAQs

Q: What is Mole?

A: Mole is a debugging tool for .NET developers.  It can be opened in Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, or Visual Studio 2013 while you are stepping through your source code after hitting a breakpoint.  Mole was implemented as a custom debugger visualizer so that you can easily use it just like any other visualizer available in Visual Studio.

Q: How do I open Mole?

A: Please refer to the Getting Started page for information about how to open Mole 2010, Mole 2012, or Mole 2013.

Q: Do I have to purchase Mole 2010, Mole 2012, or Mole 2013 separately or do I have to pay for a version upgrade from Mole 2010 to Mole 2012, to Mole 2013?

A: No. When you purchase Mole 2010, you get Mole 2012 and Mole 2013 at no additional cost. Your license key works for all three versions.

Q: What if I only want Mole 2012 or Mole 2013, do I have to purchase Mole 2010?

A: Your purchase of Mole includes Mole 2010,  Mole 2012, and Mole 2013 at no additional cost.

Q: Can I install Mole 2010, Mole 2012, and Mole 2013 on the same computer?

A: Yes, providing you have Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, and Visual Studio 2013 installed on the same computer.

Q: Can I use Mole 2010, Mole 2012, or Mole 2013 with the Visual Studio 2010 Express, Visual Studio 2012 Express, or Visual Studio 2013 Express editions?

A: Yes, Mole 2010, Mole 2012, or Mole 2013 can be used with the Express edition. However, if Express is the only version of Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, or Visual Studio 2013 installed on your computer, you must ensure that the installation directory is one of the following:

On 64-bit versions of Windows:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger\Visualizers

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger\Visualizers

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger\Visualizers

On 32-bit versions of Windows:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger\Visualizers

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger\Visualizers

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 12.0\Common7\Packages\Debugger\Visualizers

Q: How does the licensing and activation work?

A: The first time you run Mole 2010, Mole 2012, or Mole 2013 (not the trial versions), you’ll be prompted to enter your name and license key number you received when you purchased Mole.  Mole will then execute the activation process.  Activation is on a per user basis.  If you log into the machine with Mole installed for all users with different user accounts, you’ll need to Activate Mole again for that user account. According to the new licensing agreement, you are authorized to install Mole on your computers (home, laptop, and work.) If you have both Mole 2010, Mole 2012, or Mole 2013 on the same machine, you will only need to activate once for your user account.

Q: What .NET platforms and languages does Mole support?

A: Mole is a general purpose debugging tool for all .NET developers.  It works with applications written in any .NET language such as C# and VB.NET.  Mole has been extensively tested on a wide range of .NET platforms including: WPF, Windows Forms, ASP.NET, WCF, ADO.NET, console applications, and even more exotic environments like managed DirectX, F# and the Dynamic Language Runtime (DLR).

Q: Why doesn’t Mole support Silverlight, Metro or Windows 8 Modern Applications, or Windows Phone Applications?

A: Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, and Visual Studio 2013 do not currently support custom debugger visualizers for Silverlight, Metro or Windows 8 Modern Applications, or Windows Phone applications. Since Mole is a debugger visualizer, and Visual Studio does not support a Silverlight, Metro or Windows 8 Modern Applications, or Windows Phone enabled version of Mole at this time. Please provide feedback to Microsoft if you would like to see all XAML platforms support debugger visualizers.

Q: What versions of Visual Studio support Mole?

A: Mole works in all versions of Visual Studio that supports debugger visualizers, as listed on this page.  Basically, Mole works in all versions of Visual Studio.

Q: Why does Visual Studio 2010, Visual Studio 2012, or Visual Studio 2013 list Mole as an available visualizer twice for a few objects?

A: In the \My Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Visualizers directory and the \My Documents\Visual Studio 2012\Visualizers directory  and the \My Documents\Visual Studio 2012\Visualizers directory there is a file named autoexp.dll which informs Visual Studio how to display certain objects in the debugger windows. Due to the way Visual Studio works with custom debugger visualizers, types listed in that file have "Mole 2010", "Mole 2012", or “Mole 2013” listed twice in the DataTips and debugging windows. This is limited to a few WinForms controls, WebForms controls, various types of exceptions, a handful of  types in the System.Drawing namespace, and a few others.  The only other alternative is for objects of those types to not have Mole 2010, Mole 2012, ore Mole 2013 as an available visualizer at all, which we assumed most people would not prefer.

Q: How does the trial version of Mole work?

A: The trial versions of Mole have a nag screen that displays when Mole is opened. Additionally, the Moloscope only shows a limited number of properties instead of showing all properties of an object.

Q: If I have a trial version and then purchase Mole, do I have to uninstall the trial version before installing the full version of Mole?

A: No, just install the full version of Mole on the computer, it will remove the previous version.